Social media for churches, Islamic centres, temples, gurdwaras, synagogues

fbrn_soc_med_picIntroduction to Social Media – Tuesday, March 10 from 1pm to 4.30pm

Our friends at the Faith Based Regeneration Network invite us to join them for a specially designed workshop.

Connecting with the online world can seem like just another demand on already-stretched time, a mysterious new way of communicating with its own language and customs and a poor substitute to face-to-face conversations. We’ll show you what you’re missing!

Communication consultant Vicky Akrill, director of Art & Flo, will show you how social media can work effectively for you and your organisation, help make valuable connections and build beneficial working relationships.

Registration from 1.00pm. Workshop 1.30-4.30pm. Followed by tea/refreshments and an opportunity to network with participants and FbRN staff.

For further information contact FbRN’s Senior Consultant, Steve Miller at stevemiller@fbrn.org.uk.

LBFN took part in FbRN’s last social media workshop.  It was very well run, practical and inspiring.  There was plenty for beginners and seasoned social networkers alike.

The cost is £30. Click here to book online.  FbRN will send full details and directions to the venue as soon as your booking is received.

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Working smarter: Training Tuesdays

Facebooktwitter-logoAre Facebook, Twitter & social media a waste of time?  Or valuable and worth the effort?

And how do we measure the positive impact our work is having?

FbRN logoOur friends at the Faith-based Regeneration Network are offering a couple of timely workshops:

Introduction to Social Media – Tuesday 14th October

Introduction to Impact Measurement – Tuesday 28th October

“These afternoon-long sessions will offer practical help, good ideas and actions to take away.

Registration from 1.00pm. Workshop 1.30-4.30pm.  Followed by tea/refreshments and an opportunity to network with participants and FbRN staff.

Offered at a great value introductory rate of just £10 per session, places are limited so if you want to learn more about communicating or understanding results, come along.”

Following on from LBFN’s recent afternoon on resources & funding, these workshops offer ideas on working in smarter and more effective ways for the benefit of our local communities.  Book now!

Writing bids & fundraising workshop

fundraisingFundraising skills and individual advice for faith-based groups here in London – ideal for beginners and upgraders.

FbRN welcomes LBFN friends to its Vauxhall offices at 308 Kennington Lane, London, SE11 5HY on Tuesday 13 May.  Registration from 1.00pm, workshop 1.30-4.30pm. Followed by tea/refreshments and an opportunity to network with participants and FbRN staff.

“Money is tight these days. But there are sources of funds around and with a well written bid, they are not impossible to get. Often we limit ourselves because we haven’t got time or we find the whole bid-writing process too difficult. This workshop will take participants through the process of writing a well constructed bid. We will be looking at the Awards for All scheme as an example, but the skills will apply to any funding bid.

The workshop will be led by Mohammed Mamdani who is the founder and director of Al-Mizan Charitable Trust and a trustee of FbRN. He has 12 years’ experience in supporting small, grassroots charities with fundraising, project management and governance.  The workshop costs £5 to cover admin and refreshment costs but FbRN requests a refundable deposit of £25. Payment of £30 to be made in advance and £25 refunded after attendance.”

logo_fbrnRegister online here.   For further information contact FbRN’s Executive Director, Steve Miller on stevemiller@fbrn.org.uk.  Full directions to the venue will be sent as soon as booking is received.

Next LBFN meeting

The next LBFN meeting will take place at 2pm on Thursday 28th February at Emmanuel Room, Central Hall Westminster, Storey’s Gate, SW1H 9NH. We are grateful to Elizabeth Simon of the London Church Leaders for kindly hosting our meeting, which will look back over significant changes in context since LBFN started 10 years ago.

We will be hearing from Elizabeth and also from

  • Steve Miller, Faith-based Regeneration Network – changes in government policy
  • Karen Walkden, Flourishing, Barnet – trends for 2013: local religious and multifaith organisations
  • Malik Gul, Wandsworth Community Empowerment Network – community co-production of public services
  • Roz Miller, Islington Faiths Forum – partnership working on common concerns
  • Eshaan Akbar and Evereth Willis, Merton Council – LSP: voluntary sector/partnerships, equalities/cohesion

Gavin Moorhead and John Maiden will be giving us advance information on the Building on History project. We will also be meeting intern Tara Thiyagarajan for the first time.

Please join us for this starry line-up and an unrivalled exchange of experience and expertise across London. Let me know by 26th February if you are planning to come.

Integration & locally-led action

iCoCo asks us to save the date 23rd April for an event in central London –

At Ease With Each Other

“A major opportunity to discuss cohesion and integration in the UK; with Secretary of State Eric Pickles MP, Ben Page, David Goodhart, Ted Cantle and others.”

This follows the publication by the Department for Communities and Local Government of Creating the Conditions for Integration last month.  The document sets out the government’s approach to integration.  Discrimination and hate crime against Muslims and Jews are mentioned, as well as the positive role that the Faith-based Regeneration Network, the Near Neighbours Programme and the Inter Faith Network for the UK are playing.  The promotion of economic regeneration by local authorities is encouraged, with a caution against the implicit endorsement of divisive groups by engagement or the use of public buildings.

The document places an emphasis on the role of local community groups and ‘locally-led action’.  It says,

‘Our new approach is focused on how we create the conditions for integration to happen. Instead of large-scale, centrally led and funded programmes, we want to inspire and enable civil society and local areas to take action on integration issues that are important to them.’

Shall we discuss this at our next meeting?  Who might be interested to hear the views of local multifaith groups?  Who would you like to hear speak?